Tag Archives: Odyssey Book 2

The Odyssey Book 2: lines 96-102

The speech of Antinous, the leader of the suitors, continues in these lines, as it will in the lines of the Odyssey that follow. What stands out in this passage is first that Antinous seeks to speak badly of Penelope … Continue reading

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The Odyssey Book 2: lines 85-95

Since Telemachus has just given his speech swaying the people, now Antinous chooses to address his fellow suitors instead. Before getting to the speech itself, one should realize just how this tactic wold appear to the ancient Greek audience. Especially … Continue reading

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The Odyssey: Book 2 – a necessary digression

This particular blog post deals with necessary background to what is happening in Book 2 of the Odyssey. Most readers will have heard the Greek word πόλις (pronounced [pólis]) and will have been told simply that it means city. Yet … Continue reading

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The Odyssey: Book 2 lines 35-39

As Book 2 of the Odyssey continues, the old warrior Aegyptius of Ithaca has set the stage for Telemachus to address the assembly as the son of Odysseus. What one should bear in mind is that by the customs of … Continue reading

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The Odyssey: Book 2 lines 25-34

Book 2 of the Odyssey continues with the address to the assembly by the old warrior Aegyptius (as implied rather than explicitly stated). In essence, he has heard the news that Odysseus is alive on the island of Calypso and … Continue reading

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The Odyssey: Book 2 lines 1-24

The second book of the Odyssey begins with the coming of the next dawn. This passage gives a fascinating insight into the manner of dress and daily habits of the early ancient Greeks. Telemachus awakes and puts on his sword … Continue reading

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